Sunday, 27 September 2015

HMQS Gayundah Part 3

Scuttles.


No, not the late, great Fred, but what a lot of people refer to as "Portholes".
The proper Naval terminology is scuttle or sometimes a "Port Light".
Port holes are more properly an opening in the ship's side and allows personnel or cargo ingress or egress.
Anyway, the Gayundah requires quite a number of scuttles and this is the method I used to represent them.


Two lengths of telescoping styrene tube.   The larger to be the diameter of the scuttle you require.   These are cut roughly into rings of the required size.   
To obtain a uniform thickness, these rough rings were filed using the hole in an industrial hacksaw for the smaller ring and I drilled a suitably sized hole in some plastic sheet for the larger ring.
Whatever you use as a filing guide make sure it is a snug fit otherwise the ring may roll in the hole and you will not get the desired effect.


Once the rings are filed to a uniform thickness, the smaller rings are glued to a backing piece of .20 thou plastic sheet.   Once dry, they are trimmed to the outside diameter of the inner ring.   They are inserted into the larger ring and glued in place.   They are recessed slightly.
Then it is just a matter of inserting into the predrilled holes in the ship's side/hull and gluing in place.



The last two photos show the hull scuttles in situ as well as the stern finished.   The curved stern was covered in thin strips of .20 thou conforming roughly to the curve of the stern and then puttied and sanded a few times to achieve a smooth finish.


The two sides of the superstructure were prepared, the scuttles were let in as well as a small rectangular opening low on the side.   Internal bracing and support tabs were also glued on the interior.

Heads and Baths.
(and other accommodation.)


From left to Right - The Chief Engineers Cabin (I think), the Boiler Uptakes and Galley and the Senior Sailors Heads and Baths.   I made up a Cutlass Rack and a Fire Hose stowage as well as some Dip Tubes (for measuring Fresh Water Tanks).   All spurious as I cannot find interior photos for the life of me, but I felt the bulkheads needed something.   I know modern day warships have their bulkheads crammed with all sorts of gear as stowage space is always at a premium but as far as the Victorian era goes???


The above mentioned accommodation spaces as well the superstructure sides in place.   These have been braced both vertically and horizontally.
In the next post I hope to deal with the Main Armament Embrasure and the 01 Deck.









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6 comments:

  1. Coming along very nicely! Great work.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Rodger! It's a big job, but I think it look alright when finished!
      Cheers
      Col

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  2. Cool project mate, enjoying the progress I am too

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mate! I have just finished the front of the superstructure this morning. It's starting to look like a ship!
      Cheers
      Col

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  3. This is epic stuff! I don't think there's enough waterline 'how to..' on the net. It's really taking shape. Can't wait to see it in all its glory.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mate! I must admit it is a learning process for me just figuring out how to do things, but it is coming together quite well.
      Cheers
      Col

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